Philip Hayward. Bounty Chords: Music, Dance and Cultural Heritage on Norfolk and Pitcairn Islands.

Philip Hayward.  Bounty Chords:  Music, Dance and Cultural Heritage on Norfolk and Pitcairn Islands.  Eastleigh, UK:  John Libbey & Co, 2006. Pp 256.  £15.00.

Kevin Hood
Indiana University

In Philip Hayward’s Bounty Chords seemingly every aspect of music on Pitcairn Island and Norfolk Island is examined to the finest detail, leaving no proverbial stone unturned.  From the settlement of these South Pacific colonies to the present day, Bounty Chords gives the reader an interesting, though somewhat burdened history of expressive arts on the islands.

Continue reading “Philip Hayward. Bounty Chords: Music, Dance and Cultural Heritage on Norfolk and Pitcairn Islands.”

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Fruits and Culture: A Preliminary Examination of Food-for-Sex Metaphors in English-language Caribbean Music

Fruits and Culture: A Preliminary Examination of Food-for-Sex Metaphors in English-language Caribbean Music

Lyra Spang
Indiana University

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways that food, sexuality and gender roles interact in the Anglophone Caribbean, specifically in the country of Belize. Using analysis of food-for-sex metaphors in popular music, it explores the role of homosociality and separate gender roles in defining food and sexuality as highly charged spaces for cross-gender interaction. The objective of this exploratory analysis is to determine whether these two areas of interaction overlap to form a highly gendered “food-sex arena” that shapes discourse about food, sexuality and gender roles therein.

Continue reading “Fruits and Culture: A Preliminary Examination of Food-for-Sex Metaphors in English-language Caribbean Music”

Jerry M. Hay. Rivers Revealed: Rediscovering America’s Waterways.

Jerry M. Hay. Rivers Revealed: Rediscovering America’s Waterways. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2007. Pp. ix + 308, photographs, index. $19.95 paper.

Callie Clare
Indiana University

It is clear in reading Rivers Revealed that Jerry M. Hay is more than just knowledgeable about the rivers running through America’s heartland. Hay has made these rivers his life and has concerned himself not only with understanding the vessels that operate on them but also with their anatomy and how they flow and grow during their most peaceful of times and their most dangerous. Each chapter is a narrative about his experiences on the river, starting out with a story of him as a 15-year-old boy in a johnboat following a group of canoeists down the river for a multi-day 200-mile trip. The rest of the stories stem from this one, recounting the experiences of the wide-eyed 15-year-old as he ages and navigates the entire Wabash River, makes his own boat, rides on a towboat, and works for the Delta Queen Steamboat Company as a riverlorian on two of the most romanticized riverboats in the country: the Delta Queen and Mississippi Queen, which have since been retired, no longer to be seen traveling the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. Continue reading “Jerry M. Hay. Rivers Revealed: Rediscovering America’s Waterways.”

Biscuit Revivalism: Salvaging Southern Foodways in the Family and Beyond

Biscuit Revivalism: Salvaging Southern Foodways in the Family and Beyond

Whitney Brown
University of North Carolina

Abstract:

The field of folklore has been preoccupied historically with  authenticity.  But what happens to authenticity when real life  necessitates practical changes to tradition?  Through the material  culture and memories of the kitchen and table, “Biscuit Revivalism”  traces the evolution of Southern foodways across three generations of  one family.  Their lifestyle and dietary changes give rise to many  questions about tradition and its continuity (or obliteration), and  their particular story is emblematic of a larger one transpiring  across the modern-day South.  This paper considers the influence of  memory, nostalgia, class, education, travel, feminism, politics, and  health as it explores the process by which individuals negotiate the  traditions of family and region.  A meditation on tradition, “Biscuit  Revivalism” demonstrates that not only genes, but also stories,  recipes, and skillets tie the twenty-first century Southern woman to  the her Depression-era counterparts.  While by turns it is  romanticized, hybridized, or cast aside completely, tradition, in  fact, finds its strength in change. Continue reading “Biscuit Revivalism: Salvaging Southern Foodways in the Family and Beyond”